1978 - 1981 Report of Activities

A major influence on us was a story on Integral Urban House in Berkeley, California, in the January 1978 issue of Atlantic magazine, and a book by two of the house founders‚ William and Helga Olkowski‚ titled The City People’s Book of Raising Food

Michael Levenston
Gardening Pays Says City Farmer

“You certainly can save money. Everybody should grow something whether on a balcony, a patio or your backyard,” she said, adding that only a few basic tools are needed for home gardening.

 

Michael Levenston
1981 – The Garden’s Beginnings

The garden began to take shape on a warm fall Sunday in 1981, when 11 people met in the backyard of the newly opened centre at Maple Street and Sixth Avenue, overlooking the Burrard Bridge, which spans False Creek and leads to downtown Vancouver.

Michael Levenston
Iron Gate Tells Railway History

The window/gate is made of “obtainium”, materials that were collected and recycled from close to our location. Most striking in the assemblage are parts from the century old railway, such as spikes left behind by the crews who took up the old tracks.

Michael Levenston
Balcony Composting

People using indoor bins can collect their compost every three to four months. After separating the wriggler worms from the new soil, they can start all over again

Michael Levenston
We Make Beer

We acquired some locally sourced hop rhizomes and created a large container garden, which we filled with a combination of our own backyard compost, vermi-compost and municipal made compost. 

Michael Levenston
The Cob Shed

When completed, the tool shed will have a living green roof, a surrounding bench area and an impressively sculpted cob cooking oven.

Michael Levenston
Our Country Lane

City Farmer's demonstration garden was chosen as one of three pilot sites for this alternative to the growing number of asphalt lanes. 

Michael Levenston
Rodent-Resistant Composting

Levenston recommends that wooden compost bins be constructed “like a cage,” covered on top and bottom and on all sides with half-inch hardware cloth, a strong (20 gauge) wire
meshing. Any bin not enclosed is an invitation to rats, which shelter in the warm bins.

Michael Levenston